education

Education is the proper way to promote compassion and tolerance in society. Compassion and peace of mind bring a sense of confidence that reduce stress and anxiety, whereas anger and hatred come from frustration and undermine our sense of trust. Because of ignorance, many of our problems are our own creation. Education, however, is the instrument that increases our ability to employ our own intelligence.
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detoxing the spirit

THE DETOX PERIOD
“When you refrain from habitual thoughts and behavior, the uncomfortable feelings will still be there. They don’t magically disappear. Over the years, I’ve come to call resting with the discomfort “the detox period,” because when you don’t act on your habitual patterns, it’s like giving up an addiction. You’re left with the feelings you were trying to escape. The practice is to make a wholehearted relationship with that.”
(From Living Beautifully With Uncertainty and Change-Pema’s new book!)

Thank you Shambhala Publications for our weekly Heart Advice of the Week!

The Dream….

THE DREAM OF CONSTANT OKAYNESS

It’s not impermanence per se, or even knowing we’re going to die, that is the cause of our suffering, the Buddha taught. Rather, it’s our resistance to the fundamental uncertainty of our situation. Our discomfort arises from all of our efforts to put ground under our feet, to realize our dream of constant okayness. When we resist change, it’s called suffering. But when we can completely let go and not struggle against it, when we can embrace the groundlessness of our situation and relax into its dynamic quality, that’s called enlightenment, or awakening to our true nature, to our fundamental goodness. Another word for that is freedom—freedom from struggling against the fundamental ambiguity of being human.
(From Living Beautifully with Uncertainty and Change)
And thanks to our friends at Shambhala Pubs for the always insightful Heart Advice of the Week!)

capacity for love and tenderness

REJOICING GENERATES GOOD WILL
“The next time you go out in the world, you might try this practice: directing your attention to people—in their cars, on the sidewalk, talking on their cell phones—just wish for them all to be happy and well. Without knowing anything about them, they can become very real, by regarding each of them personally and rejoicing in the comforts and pleasures that come their way. Each of us has this soft spot: a capacity for love and tenderness. But if we don’t encourage it, we can get pretty stubborn about remaining sour.”
(From No Time To Lose by Pema Chödrön)

awareness

An aspect of the Buddha’s teachings that makes them distinctly different from world religions is that his main focus was on the importance of awareness. Awareness is the main healer of the split in consciousness that every human experiences, in early childhood, with the formation of ego, the identification with being a separate “me,” distinctly different from all other life. Awareness heals that split. Awareness is closely related, if not the same thing, as love–unconditional love, the big love. –Robert Hall, “Buddha Now”

we create problems

Although we are all the same in not wanting problems and wanting a peaceful life, we tend to create a lot of problems for ourselves. Encountering those problems, anger develops and overwhelms our mind, which leads to violence. A good way to

 counter this and to work for a more peaceful world is to develop concern for others. Then our anger, jealousy and other destructive emotions will naturally weaken and diminish.

Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama

Photo: Although we are all the same in not wanting problems and wanting a peaceful life, we tend to create a lot of problems for ourselves. Encountering those problems, anger develops and overwhelms our mind, which leads to violence. A good way to counter this and to work for a more peaceful world is to develop concern for others. Then our anger, jealousy and other destructive emotions will naturally weaken and diminish.

-Tenzin Gyatso, 14th Dalai Lama

says a lot about our culture

Photo: Says much about our world today :-)

Buddhist Bicycle Pilgrimage: September 29-30, 2012

 

All user accounts from the old DharmaWheels web site, created on or before August 21, 2012 at 11:00am, are not available.  We apologize for the inconvenience but we ask that you please create a new account on this, our newwebsite.    Thank you.

                            Status
  • Volunteer Registration….Open
  • Rider Registration……….Open
  • Food Donations………….Open
  • Donating Dana……………Open

Please familiarize yourself with our new website and when you’re ready, click here to start registering.

In its 11th consecutive year, the Buddhist Bicycle Pilgrimage (BBP) is a two day 140-mile ride starting from Spirit Rock in Woodacre (Marin County), California. We bicycle North stopping for food, Dharma talks and meditation at Buddhist monasteries along the way, camp one night in Cloverdale, and end the ride at Abhayagiri Monastery, near Ukiah, in Redwood Valley.

Financial dana helps sustain the Pilgrimage each year as logistical costs are underwritten. In addition, each year we have been able to provide generous donations to our friends at Abhayagiri, City of 10,000 Buddhas, Sae Taw Win, and Spirit Rock Meditation Center which helps sustain their community and our ability to return.

The Buddhist Bicycle Pilgrimage is made possible entirely through a volunteer effort and your generous dana.  If you have not already done so, please take a moment to consider offering financial dana now.

The BBP Miracle

The miracle of the pilgrimage is that every cost, every logistical detail is met through acts of generosity. For each BBP, a large group of coordinators and volunteers, cyclists, cooks, and various support teams, join in this annual practice of Pilgrimage. It is spirit, love, energy and right action (and of course a lot of work) that makes this event a miracle — the miracle of generosity.

Will you join us?

We are still seeking several key coordinator roles that need to be filled. In total, the BBP needs around 40+ volunteers who:

  • Place route markers to help you find your way,
  • Pack the truck with your luggage and transport it along the route,
  • Kitchen staff that wash, slice, dice, boil, bake and cook our food,
  • Rest stop teams that setup and break down stops and offer cheer and sustenance,
  • SAG teams that keep you safe on the road and pick you up when in need,
  • Volunteer coordinators who assign volunteers with teams and align volunteer cars with drivers to haul people and goods along the way,
  • clean up teams; check-in teams; and a variety of other functions all covered by volunteers.

We can do it again this year but we need your help. Click on Registration/Volunteer from the top menu bar.

With Metta,

The DharmaWheels Foundation (Offering the Buddhist Bicycle Pilgrim

resentment

Resentment, whether cold fury or smoldering rage, hardens your emotions, narrows your options in responding to life, clouds your judgment, locks you out of experiencing the flow of life, shifts your attention from those who matter to you to

 those whom you disdain, and deadens your spirit. Why would you choose to live in this manner? It gives those who wronged you an even greater victory than their original act. You can also embrace forgiveness practice as an act of selflessness, something that you can do to stop the seemingly endless cycle of hatred in the world.
– Phillip Moffitt, “Emotional Chaos to Clarity”

we struggle

Feeling powerless over the most important things in our lives, we struggle, we create suffering. We wage war with others, with events, with anything we don’t like. But when we become aware of the often misleading nature of our thoughts, we step outside of the battles they create and see that we are waging a war that we can’t win. To stop the battle and step out of the hypnotism of our thoughts is the liberation of mindfulness of the mind. Mindfulness allows us to know the limits of the thinking mind, to return to the heart. –Jack Kornfield, “A Lamp in the Darkness”